Tag Archives: 2 Kings 6

Praying for Your Eyes

This morning, my preparations for a meeting tomorrow had my eyes on the first chapter of Ephesians when these verses jumped out at me:

This is why, since I heard about your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love for all the saints, I never stop giving thanks for you as I remember you in my prayers. I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, would give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him. I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened so that you may know what is the hope of his calling, what is the wealth of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the mighty working of his strength. –Ephesians 1:15-19

Paul didn’t have an endless amount of paper, and he couldn’t fire off letters as easily as we send emails today. Why then does he spend–I want to say “waste”–so much space on this topic. I’m inclined to read this and say, “Okay, okay, we get it. You pray for us. Now get on to the good stuff!”

Since I’m not quite the spiritual giant that Paul was, I’m going to assume that my impatience reflects poorly not on him but on me. To that end, I’d like to look at the substance of his apparently endless prayers. Let’s take these verses apart and examine them.

Thanks for the Ephesians–Paul doesn’t just thank God for the Ephesians. He claims to “never stop giving thanks.” I routinely thank God for my wife, but beyond that I’m bad about not thanking him for the others in my life. Either I’m falling down in this regard or the people in my world don’t rise to the level of those in Ephesus.

Spirit of wisdom–Notice that when Paul gets around to asking God for things on behalf of the Ephesians, he doesn’t pray for their pastor search or their building fund. He asks that God will give them the Spirit of wisdom. It seems to me that the following three requests are more specific effects of that Spirit.

Hope of his calling–Paul is addressing himself here to the “faithful saints at Ephesus” (Ephesians 1:1). I’d expect that they wouldn’t need to experience the hope of God’s calling, but that’s what Paul asks for them to see first. But then I recognize that although I have experienced that calling and enjoyed some of its blessings, I don’t always have a clear vision of the hope that it provides. If I did, would I still struggle so constantly with sin?

Wealth of his inheritance–Here he doesn’t pray that they’ll receive an inheritance but that they’ll recognize just how rich an inheritance they’ve already gained. Again, if I were truly cognizant of those riches, would I worry about a high electrical bill?

Immeasurable greatness of his power–Again, Paul prays that the Ephesians will see God’s power. He doesn’t ask God to be with them–he’s always with them. Instead he prays that they will have their eyes open, like Elisha’s servant in 2 Kings 6:17 to recognize that power.

I rarely pray these things for myself. Almost never do I pray them for others. Instead, I pray for Aunt Edna’s gout or Cousin Buford’s marriage problems. Clearly, I’m blind when it comes to intercessory prayer. I just need to pray that people’s eyes will be open. That will solve a host of other problems.